Ukrainians are ready to leave Severadonetsk while the Russians advance an inch


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  • It’s been four months since the war started

Kyiv (Reuters) – Ukraine on Friday signaled the withdrawal of its forces from the city of Svodontsk, which has seen weeks of fierce fighting, in what could be a major setback in its fight to defeat Russian forces.

Provincial Governor Serhi Gedayi said troops in the city had already received orders to move to new locations, but he did not specify if they had done so or where they were heading.

“It doesn’t make sense to stay in bad shape for several months to stay there,” Kaidoi told Ukrainian television.

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He said the troops should be withdrawn.

Guido spoke on the eve of four months since Russian President Vladimir Putin sent tens of thousands of troops to the border, sparking a conflict that has killed thousands of militants and civilians, decimated millions and devastated Ukrainian cities. Russian artillery pieces and air strikes.

The war also caused a global energy and food crisis.

Some of the heaviest fighting of the war took place in Sevdonetsk, where street fighting raged for a month.

The war was important for Russia to establish control over the last Ukrainian-controlled part of Luhansk Province, which, along with Donetsk, Donbass, constitutes the industrial center of Ukraine.

The fall of Sivirodonetsk will leave only the city of Lyczynsk on the western bank of the Shivarsky Donetsk River – it will remain in the hands of the Ukrainians.

Russian tactics since the failure of Russian forces to capture the capital Kai in the early stages of the war have included brutal bombing of towns and villages, followed by ground attacks.

Analysts say the Russian forces are facing heavy losses and problems with leadership, distribution and morale. However, they are crushing the Ukrainian opposition and making increasing gains in the east and south.

Ukrainian officials said on Friday that the Russians had fired from tanks, engines, artillery and aircraft and carried out air strikes near Lysyansk, Severadonetsk and nearby towns. Reuters could not immediately confirm the news.

EU payment

Despite the difficulties of the war in Ukraine, it was strengthened by the support of the West. On Thursday, European leaders approved Ukraine’s formal application to join the European Union.

While the journey to full membership will take many years, the move has boosted Ukraine’s morale — and angered Putin.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Jelensky told European Union leaders in Brussels on Thursday that his decision to accept Ukraine’s candidacy was significant since it broke away from the Soviet Union 31 years ago.

“But this decision was not made solely in the interests of Ukraine,” he said. “This is the biggest step that can be taken now to strengthen Europe…as the Russian war is testing our ability to defend independence and unity.”

Moscow launched its so-called “special military operation” on February 24, saying it wanted to ensure security on its borders. Kyiv and the West say Putin launched an unprovoked invasion to seize Ukrainian territory and return the country to Moscow.

In 2014, Russian control of the Donbass River will allow the already occupied Crimea to be annexed to southern Ukraine from Moscow.

Russian forces have blocked Ukrainian naval communications in the northwestern part of the Black Sea, and civilians say they are trying to resume attacks in the Mykolaiv region.

The port of Mikhailov, a river port and shipyard a short distance from the Black Sea, was a stronghold against Russian efforts to advance west towards the main port city of Odessa.

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Reuters office report. Written by Michael Perry and Angus Maxwan; Editing by Himani Sarkar and William Maclean

Our Standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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